Archive for the ‘Job Survey’ Category


Jobs in a Recession Survey Results 5: What Recent Hires Recommend To Job Seekers

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Jobs in a Recession Survey Results 5: What Recent Hires Recommend To Job Seekers

This is part 5 of an ongoing community project (see all posts) to help people understand how to get jobs during a recession.

This data is slightly skewed towards those that are already active in social media as the survey went to those within my network on my blog and the highly connected Twitter community. There were 214 respondents to the survey although this graphic only represents those who got jobs since Sept 2008 (71 respondents) that represent those that were hired during the announcement of the recession. This sample set is smaller than one would expect out of a formal research project, after multiple promotions, it was capping out at 200 respondents, and I don’t have other resources to deploy against email lists, or affiliate programs. This is a personal research project, and is not tied to my employer, clients, or anyone else for that matter.


Finding 5: What Recent Hires Recommend To Job Seekers
This is just the data from the 71 respondents that got hired since Sept 2008 (since the recession was announced).

  • Although these answers were open ended, I tried to summarize them into categories, and then graphed them as shown above, please note that some of the individuals gave more than one suggestion per answer, and some did not answer at all.
  • Note that their recommendations to connect with others online, is consistent with how they got jobs from friends and family. Which is the same as the first finding from this project
  • Notice how 9 out of the respondents encourage you to learn new skills by reading online, or by attending classes.
  • This means that 78% of respondents were hired in full employment positions, likely with benefits.


    Recommendations for Job Seekers in a Recession

  • The recommendations are very clear, use online social networking tools to connect with others, and get educated by reading online or take classes
  • Important: In addition to reading my summary, here all the responses that they suggested to those who are seeking jobs –and their observations how the market has changed.

  • To find the other results from this survey, I’ll be tagging the post “Job Survey” and you can click that category to learn more.

    Coming soon I’ll be posting results for: titles that were hired, and some other interesting data cuts

    Resources: See my Web Strategy Job Board, or Job Wire.

    Jobs in a Recession Survey Results 4: Most Recent Hires Found Full-Time Positions

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    Jobs in a Recession Survey Results 4: Most Recent Hires Found Full-Time Positions

    This is part 4 of an ongoing community project to help people understand how to get jobs during a recession.

    This data is slightly skewed towards those that are already active in social media as the survey went to those within my network on my blog and the highly connected Twitter community. There were 214 respondents to the survey although this graphic only represents those who got jobs since Sept 2008 (71 respondents) that represent those that were hired during the announcement of the recession. This sample set is smaller than one would expect out of a formal research project, after multiple promotions, it was capping out at 200 respondents, and I don’t have other resources to deploy against email lists, or affiliate programs. This is a personal research project, and is not tied to my employer, clients, or anyone else for that matter.


    Finding 4: Most Recent Hires Found Full-Time Positions
    This is just the data from the 71 respondents that got hired since Sept 2008 (since the recession was announced).

  • 78% of those recently hired reported that they landed full-time jobs
  • A mere 7% received contract, and another 7% received consultant jobs
  • Even less received part time jobs
  • This means that 78% of respondents were hired in full employment positions, likely with benefits.


    Recommendations for Job Seekers in a Recession

  • Don’t change strategy just yet and offer up that you’ll work part time if you really want a full time position.
  • Companies are still seeking full time bodies for long term programs –make sure your resume reflects this.
  • For those seeking part time, consulting or contracting, you should also think about other job opportunities in full time positions.

  • To find the other results from this survey, I’ll be tagging the post “Job Survey” and you can click that category to learn more.

    Coming soon I’ll be posting results for: titles that were hired, and some other interesting data cuts

    Resources: See my Web Strategy Job Board, or Job Wire.

    Jobs in a Recession Survey Results 3: Most Recent Hires Received “Average” Compensation

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    Those that were recently hired did not suffer from reduced compensation

    This is part 3 of an ongoing community project to help people understand how to get jobs during a recession.

    This data is slightly skewed towards those that are already active in social media as the survey went to those within my network on my blog and the highly connected Twitter community. There were 214 respondents to the survey although this graphic only represents those who got jobs since Sept 2008 (71 respondents) that represent those that were hired during the announcement of the recession. This sample set is smaller than one would expect out of a formal research project, after multiple promotions, it was capping out at 200 respondents, and I don’t have other resources to deploy against email lists, or affiliate programs. This is a personal research project, and is not tied to my employer, clients, or anyone else for that matter.


    Finding 3: Most Recent Hires Received “Average” Compensation
    This is just the data from the 71 respondents that got hired since Sept 2008 (since the recession was announced).

  • 56% of those recently hired reported that they received “average” compensation in what they considered market range.
  • In fact, there’s some good news as 21% of those recently hired reported that they received “more” compensation in what they considered market range.
  • 14% of those recently hired reported that they received “less” compensation in what they considered market range.
  • This means that 77% of respondents were to be paid an “average” or “more” compensation that what they considered market range.


    Recommendations for Job Seekers in a Recession

  • Job compensation rates are still holding up, employers haven’t had the need to cut back on compensation –yet.
  • This may due to the fact that many talented and experienced workers are seeking jobs, and keeping costs high
  • Job seekers shouldn’t ‘dumb down’ their resume to get in the door just yet, the job market hasn’t fully slumped, at least in the face of compensation. I know of some cases in the last dot bomb where people left their graduate degrees OFF their resume in order to be considered.
  • At some point this will turn over, and people may get hired with “Less” compensation that they feel is market average, of course market average is purely a perspective, we know that you always get paid what you’re actually worth.
  • When compensation does turn south, expect employers to offer barters for increased benefits, or pay-for-performance plans where individuals are compensated for their actual job –not just salary. Job seekers should then factor into their contract a re-negotiation period when the market recovers, and ensure they are compensated correctly for over-performance.
  • Overall, this combined with the last survey results, really shows that people in this community are able to quickly find jobs, it’s not as bad as it seems –yet.

  • To find the other results from this survey, I’ll be tagging the post “Job Survey” and you can click that category to learn more. I forgot to thank some folks with their ideas for questions for the survey such as Peter Kim, Bryan Person, Chris Kenton, and Charlene Li.

    Coming soon I’ll be posting results for: titles that were hired, and some other interesting data cuts

    Resources: See my Web Strategy Job Board

    Jobs in a Recession Survey Results 2: Most Recent Hires Got Jobs in Less Than Three Months

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    Those that were recently hired were able to find a job within a short period of time

    This is part 2 of an ongoing community project to help people understand how to get jobs during a recession.

    This data is slightly skewed towards those that are already active in social media as the survey went to those within my network on my blog and the highly connected Twitter community. There were 214 respondents to the survey although this graphic only represents those who got jobs since Sept 2008 (71 respondents) that represent those that were hired during the announcement of the recession. This sample set is smaller than one would expect out of a formal research project, after multiple promotions, it was capping out at 200 respondents, and I don’t have other resources to deploy against email lists, or affiliate programs. This is a personal research project, and is not tied to my employer, clients, or anyone else for that matter.


    Finding 2: Most Recent Hires Got Jobs in Less Than 3 Months
    This is just the data from the 71 respondents that got hired since Sept 2008 (since the recession started).

  • 39% of the respondents who recently got a job were able to get a job within one of actively looking
  • 33% of the respondents that recently got a job were able to do so within 1-3 months
  • 12% shows a quick drop of respondents that recently were hired got a job 4-6 months of actively looking
  • 11% of the respondents that recently got a job took 7-9 months of actively looking
  • This means that 72% of respondents were able to get a job within 3 months of actively starting to look.


    Recommendations for Job Seekers in a Recession

  • Getting a job (for those who were hired from Sept 2008 to Jan 2009) haven’t had that much of a problem doing so
  • For those that are concerned about layoffs, should have some ‘irons in the fire’ and keep conversations going with prospective empoyers
  • Haven’t started a conversation? Be active by reaching out to your immediate network with your new skills, or projects, as shown by data from finding 1
  • Families and individuals should at least have 3 months (preferably 6 months, I’m told) of reserve capital for living expenses if someone gets laid off

  • To find the other results from this survey, I’ll be tagging the post “Job Survey” and you can click that category to learn more. I forgot to thank some folks with their ideas for questions for the survey such as Peter Kim, Bryan Person, Chris Kenton, and Charlene Li.

    Coming soon I’ll be posting results for: top industries hired, compensation rates, and some other interesting data cuts.

    Resources: See my Web Strategy Job Board

    Jobs in a Recession Survey Results 1: Recent Hires Got Jobs Via Referral from Friends, Colleagues, Alumni, or Family

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    Most Got Jobs from Referrals from Friends, Colleagues, Alumni, or Family

    This is part 1 of an ongoing community project to help people understand how to get jobs during a recession.

    This data is slightly skewed towards those that are already active in social media as the survey went to those within my network on my blog and the highly connected Twitter community. There were 214 respondents to the survey although this graphic only represents those who got jobs since Sept 2008 (71 respondents) that represent those that were hired during the announcement of the recession. This is a personal research project, and is not tied to my employer, clients, or anyone else for that matter.


    Finding 1: Most Recent Hires Got Jobs from Referrals from Friends, Colleagues, Alumni, or Family
    This is just the data from the 71 respondents that got hired since Sept 2008 (since the recession started).

  • Most (43%) get their jobs through their immediate online network of friends, colleagues, alumni, or family.
  • Although a big gap the second (12%) most used method was through online job boards or websites.
  • Some suggested on Twitter that in Europe or Asia this is the primary method of job seeking –unlike the highly wired online job market in US, I did not ask location question to verify.
  • This could also be due to the fact that my network are people already using social media and are hyper-connected to each other.
  • I had no idea this method would have been so high, if it were, I would have asked separate questions to break that out into different referral methods.


    Recommendations for Job Seekers in a Recession

  • First of all, considering the massive layoffs, almost everyone should be exploring a backup plan
  • Job seekers should nurture their relationships with their peers first.
  • Job seekers should continually keep their network educated about their new projects, skills, and work they are taking on, consider using LinkedIn, Facebook, professional website or a blog
  • They should reach out and connect with their network before they need them.
  • Interact with them in email, social networks, phone and good ol fashioned lunch meetings

  • To find the other results from this survey, I’ll be tagging the post “Job Survey” and you can click that category to learn more. Thanks to my wife who helped cut, cleansed, and graphed the data it in 1/10th the time it would take me. (and during our vacation in Hawaii!)

    Coming soon I’ll be posting results for: top industries hired, compensation rates, and duration spent looking for a job in a recession

    Resources: See my Web Strategy Job Board

    Survey: How did you get your job?

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    Layoffs are among us, even tech giant Google is apparently dicing off a significant portion of their workforce, more layoffs will come over the next year. For those that got laid off (or those that are worried about it, which is most) understanding the skills needed to land that next gig are crucial.

    One of my goals in this new year is to help support the community around me. As a result, I’m launching a survey to find out how people recently got their job, in an effort to understand the skills, ways to find jobs, and other tips from those that have landed jobs.

    Please take this survey then share it with others, I will make all of the data public (except names and emails) and will discuss the findings on a site I’ve dedicated to help folks get employed. Thanks to RWW for spreading the word on this survey. Bryan Person helps to read the word too.

    Do note, I’m doing this outside of my day job, this is simply my way of giving back to the community. Please spread the word on this in order to help others.

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    Take the survey: How did you get your job? http://snipurl.com/9n5ph