Hey Armchair Critics, Rate the SuperBowl ads this Sunday using Twitter “TwitterBowl”

I’ve created MicroMedia events before, this time, I want to frame it as an overlay to the multi million dollar advertising event, the Superbowl.


[TwitterBowl is a real-time social experiment where the audience rates million dollar advertisements in real time using Twitter]

Are you a superbowl ad critic? Of course you are, everyone is. Even if you don’t watch the superbowl, those pervasive ads will end up in YouTube, Digg, and your cousins blog and your best friends Facebook profile. Tired of others choosing which one was the funniest/stupidist/biggest waste of time? Well this year, you can rate your own superbowl ads using Twitter, and see what everyone else in Twitter thinks too.

There’s just three steps:


1) Sign up:
Get a twitter account, got that? Good.

2) Send your vote to @superbowlads: When we’re watching the game in real time, simply send a reply to superbowlads. I created this Twitter account just for this virtual event. Reply to the superbowlads account, name the commerical, and give it a rating of 1-5 stars, 5 being the best.

examples:

“@superbowlads That Pepsi commercial was funny 4 stars”

“@superbowlads The Hillary Clinton advertisement was bunko 2 stars”

“@superbowlads Bud-wise-er, that was so 10 years ago, weak. 1 star”

3) See what others rated: You can then see everyone who’s rated the ads by doing a search on any of the Twitter search tools, I like Terraminds. See this example, it’s showing all the people who have replied to superbowlads.

I’m going to be hanging at Brian Solis’s house (Eric will be there too), we’ll be tweeting the whole time, and I hope the rest of you do. And no, I’m not using this data for anything, it’s just for fun. I may try to tally up the results, but it’s not for anything official, just another way for social media to be an overlay where we take charge, where we control, and where we voice our opinions.

See you on twitterland on Sunday!

Update: There are dozens of messages coming in every few minutes. One respondent said he was tracking them on his mobile and received 677 messages in 30 minutes.

Also, twitter replies seems to be going slowly, I’m using the search tools to get updates.

Update: Chris Heuer did a quick Utterz interview asking me about the purpose of this experiment.