Usage of Twitter? Scoble questions, Peter responds

My antennae are being retrained to watch what people are saying about Forrester, my new employer. I’m starting to understand the conversations around the company and am actively starting internal conversations about what you are all saying. Yes, we are listening.

I woke up this morning to see that Robert has challenged Pete’s data in his post entitled: “Where did Forrester get its Twitter data?” Peter (Analyst) and Cynthia (Researcher) have data on usage of microblogging. His relationship with the Obvious folks gave him suspicion about the numbers. In just a few hours, Peter has responded via his blog, and Cynthia provides details on the methodology (read comments). If there’s one thing I’ve learned in my three short weeks here is that data is key, and there’s lots of it available here. Data is nothing without analysis, and even less without actionable recommendations. If you’ve more questions for Pete, he’s on Twitter.

Also, If you want to check out some of the great Analysts at Forrester, start with Bruce Temkin, who is one of the all star analysts at the firm, and has the highest read reports in the entire company. He blogs at Experience Matters, and if you’re into user experience, put him on your reader.

  • Honestly, claiming that 6% of US citizens use twitter is just plain stupid. And Peter is actually defending the numbers which is not very wise. Maybe 6% of the peolpe in your questionare did say they use twitter, if this is so you do not have a representative selection, and all of the rest of the answers in this questionare are questionable. -Would not expect this from Forrester

    Ludvik

  • Jeremiah – I’m sure you are in a tough spot here, but I think this is one of those fights that’s better to sit on the sidelines. The more people from Forrester who try to defend Peter’s ludicrous claims the worse the entire firm looks.

    Rather than defend the 6% number by creating “crafty” scenarios (such as someone embedding a twitter widget on their blog), Peter should simply have taken a step back from the whole thing, taken a breath, admitted the claims weren’t as they seemed, and moved on. Credibility is key in your industry, and nobody there is gaining any by being defensive over what is *clearly* misleading information.

  • Lukvik, Jeremy

    We had a long talk about this yesterday, all your points are heard and acknowledged. Hang tight.

  • Lukvik, Jeremy

    We had a long talk about this yesterday, all your points are heard and acknowledged. Hang tight.