Week 0ne at Forrester, on my “Quest for Truth”

(Left: I join George for coffee, behind is Forrester’s HQ in Cambridge)

As a blogger, I’m known for showing behind the curtains of the previous companies I’ve worked at, and this will be no different.

I’ve been at Forrester Research since Oct 1st, (just over a week), and I’m getting a lot of questions from the ‘sphere asking how things are going. So far, so good.

I’ve been an intense first week, from heavy training, and the blur of meeting over 100 people in just a few days. Why the heavy initiation? As a firm focused on thought leadership, we’re gearing up to meet all the constituents that make up the research process and delivery to clients, there’s a lot for me to learn.

I’ve worked at a few large companies, often with varied interactions with management, and was pleased to find out that the executive team was very involved in a fluid, open, and transparent culture. In particular, CEO George Forrester Colony, (our founder and namesake) shared with us his hardships in starting the company. From very humble garage beginnings in Boston, taking the company public, acquiring Giga we’re now approaching 1000 employees. He’s impressed upon us the desire to endure the “Quest for Truth”, and the importance for thought leadership in our “Idea Factory”.

In the spirit of uncovering the raw elements that change the world, George is keen on how and why social computing matters to the Fortune 5000 business. I was pleased to have coffee, (ok, well it was actually orange juice) this past Friday, at the end of my first week. We discussed the impacts of social media to corporations and institutions, he boiled it down to the “power is shifting”. We not only looked outward to the market, but also realized the impacts that social computing has to our own industry as Analysts. There are voices, opinions, and facts coming from customers using these tools, we’re not the only ones giving guidance –and Google is an equalizer.

On a personal note, George is both energized, agile, and ready to lead the market to the truth. On my journey, I’ve met many CEOs, have interviewed dozens on my video show, and I’ve have surprisingly am always astounded on how one individual can impact thousands of lives. At Forrester, all employees are organized by “pods”, low desks that are situated by function, and I was pleased to see George partaking in the same work setup, spartan for an executive leader. I know from experience that the culture of a company is often an output of the spirit of the CEO.

Forrester understands this new market, as they have the most analysts on social computing than any other firm, and continue to publish reports and provide guidance. This list of the analysts that blog demonstrate thought leadership in the space, while other analyst firms ‘lock’ their blogs and thought leaders behind the paywall. For those that continue to wonder if I’ll continue to blog (I’m known for publishing 2-4 times a day, including weekends) the definitive answer is “yes”. I will be using these tools, to understand them better, and to share my experiences with you, stay with me.

This is my report, after completing week one as Forrester analyst, in my continued “quest for truth”.

  • Christine Overby

    Great post, jeremiah! We are so happy to have you at forr!

  • Lots of good luck to you in the new gig. Make them send you to Phoenix to see me 🙂

  • Thanks Christine!

    Francine, I look forward to coming out and meeting you and all the startups you work with!

  • Paul Ferron

    Enlightenment from the top down, the way forward.

  • Jeremiah .. its great to see whats happening at Forrester, and my sense is you are core to that.

    I was (one of, or maybe the) first to liveblog at Forrester in 06. During that conference they spoke to a few folks, including me, about what they should change.

    I see all of this in the context of a research company that grew up with internet and ecommerce. Good stuff!!!

    http://tinyurl.com/2f3ltb

  • Colin,

    Thanks, WE are all core to the direction of Forrester, it’s been clear to me that customers come first, (as they should be) so feel free to offer you feedback!

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